1929 Harlem Globetrotters

HGT

The Harlem Globetrotters are an exhibition basketball team that combines athleticism, theater, and comedy. Over the years they have played more than 20,000 exhibition games in 120 countries. Brother Bones’s whistled version of “Sweet Georgia Brown” is the team’s signature song. “Globie” has been their mascot since 1993.
The Harlem Globetrotters were initially called Chicago Globetrotters ( 1926-1927 ) and later New York Harlem Globetrotters ( 1928-1929 )

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1963 Invention of the Lava Lamp

lava lamp

A lava lamp (or Astro lamp) is a decorative novelty item, invented by British accountant Edward Craven-Walker in 1963. The lamp contains blobs of coloured wax inside a glass vessel filled with clear liquid; the wax rises and falls as its density changes due to heating from an incandescent light bulb underneath the vessel. The appearance of the wax is suggestive of pāhoehoe lava, hence the name. The lamps are designed in a variety of styles and colours.

1961 The first Marvel Comic

marvel

Marvel started in 1939 as Timely Publications, and by the early 1950s had generally become known as Atlas Comics. Marvel’s modern incarnation dates from 1961, the year that the company launched The Fantastic Four and other superhero titles created by Stan Lee, Jack Kirby, Steve Ditko, and many others. The Walt Disney Company acquired Marvel Entertainment, Marvel Worldwide’s parent company.

 

1972 M.A.S.H. airs on TV

mash

M*A*S*H is an American television series developed by Larry Gelbart, adapted from the 1970 feature film MASH (which was itself based on the 1968 novel MASH: A Novel About Three Army Doctors, by Richard Hooker). The series was produced in association with 20th Century Fox Television for CBS, which follows a team of doctors and support staff stationed at the “4077th Mobile Army Surgical Hospital” in Uijeongbu, South Korea during the Korean War.

The series premiered in the U.S. on September 17, 1972, and ended February 28, 1983, with the finale, “Goodbye, Farewell and Amen”, becoming the most watched television episode in U.S. television history at the time, with a record-breaking 125 million viewers

1962 Invention of the standard audio cassette

audio cassette

An audio cassette is a kind of cassette which can store music and sounds. It is used with a “cassette player” or “cassette recorder”. Cassettes store the sound on a magnetic tape that is wound around the two reels in the cassette.

The standard audio cassette was invented in 1962 by the Philips company. They named it the “Compact Cassette“. The first cassettes and cassette recorders were not very good. The quality got better, and during the 1970s the cassette became a popular way to listen to music. During the 1980s, they were even more popular. The Sony Walkman helped this.

1933 King Kong

king kong

King Kong is a 1933 American fantasy monster/adventure film directed and produced by Merian C. Cooper and Ernest B. Schoedsack. The screenplay by James Ashmore Creelman and Ruth Rose was from an idea conceived by Cooper and Edgar Wallace. It stars Fay Wray, Bruce Cabot and Robert Armstrong, and opened in New York City on March 2, 1933 to rave reviews.

The film tells of a gigantic, island-dwelling ape called Kong who dies in an attempt to possess a beautiful young woman. Kong is distinguished for its stop-motion animation by Willis O’Brien and its musical score by Max Steiner. The film has been released to video, DVD, and Blu-ray Disc, and has been computer colorized.King Kong is often cited as one of the most iconic movies in the history of cinema. In 1991, it was deemed “culturally, historically and aesthetically significant” by the Library of Congress and selected for preservation in the National Film Registry. It has been remade twice: once in 1976 and again in 2005.